Sabai Sabai Thai Restaurant Review, Oberursel

A couple of weeks ago before our son Thomas flew back to England to resume his studies, we went to Sabai Sabai * Thai Restaurant for dinner. It was our son’s idea as he had just returned from a two-month teaching stint in Thailand and wanted to compare Thai food made for the German palate.

He now knew quite a bit about Thai food and so this seemed the obvious choice for our farewell dinner in style. The restaurant itself used to be the German guesthouse Gaststätte Stadt Strassburg, which closed its doors around 2007.

The interior looks spacious when you first come in. There’s the obligatory portrait of the Thai monarch on the wall with two big elephants underneath. The window sills are lined with orchids and other Thai decor. The ambiance is pleasing.

But for four people and four dishes as well as beverages, the tables are a bit small. We had to do a bit of moving plates and glasses throughout dinner.

Service was excellent. We enjoyed listening to Thomas’s small talk carried out in Thai with the waitress (yes, they have an authentic staff) and then ordered his recommendations.

I chose the Pat Thai which was excellent. The crumbly topping is roasted peanuts. Delicious!

Pat Thai

Pat Thai

Another dish we ordered was Gung Sabai Thai, a house specialty with prawns.

Gung Sabai

Gung Sabai Thai

Gaeng Kiew Wan is a green curry, and duck was my husband’s meat choice.

Gaeng Kiew Wan

Gaeng Kiew Wan

* The meaning of ‘sabai sabai’: very calm/tranquil/easygoing/comfortable

In Thai, one of the many ways of making a meaning similar to ‘very’ in English is to double the word (this might also apply to a few other Asian languages). This is called reduplication of adjectives, e.g ‘dee dee’ means very good and ‘arroy arroy’ means very delicious, etc.

Sabai Sabai Restaurant website: http://www.sabai-thai-cuisine.de/

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Balcony Harvest in September

We have someone in the family who likes to have a daily dose of fruit salad. While I was making it, I  remembered having seen one of the last ripe strawberries on the hanging planter on the balcony. We are heading towards late September by now.

I managed to pick one for the center topping, before I got sidetracked by another little plant.

fruit salad

This is what one of the strawberry planters looks like in June.

balcony strawberries

While picking the strawberry, I found this baby pine tree within the leaves of the strawberry plants. September is the time to repot trees (by now I’m an expert on baby trees), so I started digging for soil in one of the floor planters.

My, my, what a surprise. I had a potato plant earlier in the summer, raised from an old wrinkled potato. When it was time for harvest  I must have overlooked these two. Are they edible? Of course, they are.

balcony potatoes

My balcony life never seizes to amaze me. Of course, it is not all my doing, but nature itself. I feed the birds on a regular basis, not with store-bought seeds, but with old bread. They in turn bless my planters and soil with seeds from their other end. :-) The perfect cycle of life.

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Soap Box Race in Oberursel

The yearly soap box racing (German: Seifenkistenrennen) took place on 13th September, 2014 in the Strackgasse (Altstadt).

The children could train as of 3pm and their race started at 4pm. We were there in the earlier part of the afternoon and just walked through the area, while vendors and helpers were still setting up for the event. The adults had their chance to race as of 7pm.

Here are a few impressions.

soap box race in Oberursel

soap box race in Oberursel

When the tractor and the hay wagon park in front of the church.

hay wagon

Others use a town information sign to park their bicycle.

bicycle

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A Good Reason to Stay Home

“Slow down and enjoy life. It’s not only the scenery you miss by going too fast – you also miss the sense of where you are going and why.”

- Eddie Cantor -

snail

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Review on Atlantik Hotel in Celle, Germany

On our way home from the Baltic Sea, we decided to break up this eight-hour trip to Frankfurt by spending the night in Celle (Lower Saxony). What a beautiful town. Celle, obviously, did not get bombed during WWII. This town has the most half-timbered houses I have ever seen. Population: 71,000.

Celle Altstadt

Spending the night there was an impromptu decision and so the Atlantik Hotel was the first hotel I inquired within. The hotel director, Les from Scotland, struck me as a very friendly chap and when he showed me the Elvis-themed breakfast room, I knew we’d found something unusual.

Hotel Atlantik, Celle

Hotel Atlantik, Celle

Les’s hotel running motto stands true: “There are no strangers here, just friends waiting to be met.” I made new friends in the beer garden out back, in the breakfast room, and in the lounge.

Having breakfast with Elvis

Having breakfast with Elvis

room at the Atlantik Hotel Celle

I can recommend the town of Celle for a visit. The over 400 half-timbered houses had been built between the 16th – 19th century. From Frankfurt to Celle, it takes about four hours by car.

Celle is also located on the German Timber-Frame Road. This road totals almost 3,000 km in length, winding through Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, Hesse, Thuringia, Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg.

Half-timbered houses in Celle

Half-timbered houses in Celle

Hotel Atlantik: http://atlantikhotel.com/

German Timber-Frame Road Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Timber-Frame_Road

On a different note… one of the hotel helpers told us how busy Celle got during the 1987 Reforger (Return of Forces to Germany) Exercise, conducted mainly in Lower Saxony. I believe he said about 100,000 visitors came.

A friend of the man we met in Celle was apparently involved in an attempt to recover 7 multimillion dollar M1 Abrams tanks, each weighing about 60 tons, that had sunk into a bog.  Their efforts were unsuccessful, and the man believed that the tanks are still buried there.

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