Fasching Parade and Taunus Karneval 2018 in Oberursel

If you are a newcomer to Germany and/or the city of Oberursel, you might be interested in watching this cultural (and pagan) event downtown Oberursel on 11 February 2018.

Fasching (also known as Fastnacht or Karnival) begins on the 11th day of the 11th month at 11:11 a.m. every year. The real festivities begin the day after Epiphany (6th January), when Fasching enthusiasts gather at local parties held throughout various public halls in the city.

The high-light happens on Fasching Sunday, this year being on the 11 February, when around 120 splendidly decorated cars and wagons pass through the city. The tour starts at 14:11 at the Rahmtor (old city gate at the market square), and runs for about two hours. Watch out for road blocks, and detours. Most people walk there or take public transportation.

People line the streets to return the Helau* greeting from the cars, and children are eager to catch the candy thrown from the cars. Adults might have a Schnaps (German hard liquor), while standing there. Children usually bring bags to carry their candy home. Don’t forget to bring an umbrella – even on a sunny day. The umbrella, held upside down, will not only protect your head from getting hit hard by the candy, but it also serves as a convenient candy catcher.

From the archives: Fasching Parade in Steinbach, Germany

Finding a parking spot will be difficult that Sunday afternoon. Also, the local pubs and restaurants will be packed with customers starting around 4pm.

So, you should either dress up, and join the lively activities, or stay away from downtown Oberursel.

Thousands of people from neighboring towns, including Frankfurt, come to watch this spectacle.

If you are going to watch the parade, remember to bring your:

  • smart phone or camera
  • one umbrella per adult (to shield from the rain or flying candy, or both)
  • bags to carry home the candy
  • Schnaps (in a medium-sized bottle), in case the weather is nasty. To make friends, make sure to share it with the others. Bring some shot glasses. Great conversation starter.

More about this sponsored event in photos, etc.: Taunus Karneval

* Helau stands for ‘Hello!’, ‘Hurrah!’ or simply put: ‘I’m having fun!’

You can go there dressed up or in plain clothes. Enjoy the parade.

German Thanksgiving Parade

In Germany, Erntedankfest (Thanksgiving) is celebrated on the first Sunday in October. It is only a religious holiday and while growing up in a catholic village, it meant going to church, just like every Sunday.

Besides being a regular Sunday in church, on Erntedankfest though, the church gets decorated with the year’s harvest of vegetables.

Protestants however, celebrate Thanksgiving in style. The neighboring villages of Sennfeld and Gochsheim (near Schweinfurt) are both mainly protestant. Both have a Erntedanksfest Umzug (Thanksgiving Parade) with a big fest afterwards. The most popular food items on the list are Zwiebelsplootz and Federweißer.

Zwiefelsplootz and Federweisser

Here are some pictures taken in Sennfeld (Lower Franconia) on their Thanksgiving Day parade.

Thanksgiving Parade, German style

Men in feathered hats

Some little German helpers

Advert for renewable energy

Thanksgiving Parade participants

Thanksgiving Parade

bountiful harvest

It was a rather short parade, but worth attending. Sadly enough, the number of participants keeps shrinking as interest in traditions is slowly fading.