The State of Ledward Barracks, Schweinfurt, in May 2017

When I first saw these photos in its current state, I was a bit shocked. Not surprisingly though, reconstruction is underway, and my initial response in seeing this stripped and gutted was a bit of melancholy.

We used to party around that area in the late 1980s. Those were the glory days for us. 🙂

These photos were taken by Marion Zürl, and with her friendly permission, I get to share them here with you.

Conn Barracks Schweinfurt – 37th Armor in 1961

This video clip shows the 37th Armor at Conn Barracks in 1961.

(Video credits go to Hardy Hobbs)

Visit https://www.facebook.com/LedwardandConnBarracksSchweinfurt/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf for more about Conn Barracks and Ledward Barracks in Schweinfurt.

Photo Tour of Ledward Barracks, Schweinfurt, Germany in August 2016

A week ago in late August 2016, we passed by Ledward Barracks in Schweinfurt once again. This is a selection of the photos I took at the time.

Ledward Barracks has been closed since September 2014.

 Kasernenweg

Side gate Ledward Barracks

Side gate Ledward Barracks

Coming down the Kasernenweg towards Niederwerrner Strasse.

Ledward Barracks

Construction outside Ledward

Zur Heeresstrasse:Kasernenweg

The Main Gate with its name is still there.

Main Gate Ledward Barracks

Driving down Niederwerrner Strasse.

Niederwerrner Strasse in SW

Intersection Ledward Barracks Schweinfurt

Between 11 April 1945 and 19 September 2014, 100.000 U.S. soldiers and their 300.000 dependents came through Schweinfurt.

 

Goodbye, Ledward and Conn Barracks in Schweinfurt

Col. Michael Runey: The last commander of the US Army in Lower Franconia is leaving

It took the US Army barely an hour to say its goodbyes in a special ceremony on 22 May 2013. Because of yesterday’s rain, the ceremony for Col. Michael D. Runey was held at the gym of the Finney Sports Center on Conn Baracks. The ceremony was short, entertaining, humorous, and with a sentimental touch. Col. Runey is returning to Fort Knox, KY in the U.S. after two years in Schweinfurt, Germany.

He is the last military commander of the Armed Forces in Schweinfurt, and Lower Franconia. As a symbol, he turned the garrison’s flag over to Col Kelly J. Lawler, who will be the next commander for the garrisons Schweinfurt, Bamberg, and Ansbach.

Col. Lawler, the first of the two speaker, credited Col Runey for his outstanding performance, which is not easy when there are eight brigades to govern. Col. Runey shared his appreciation for the Team Schweinfurt and also mentioned the challenges and highlights of his time in Schweinfurt.

Before thanking his wife, Christy, and his four children for their support, he also praised the German hospitality, which ranged from attending the famous Honky Tonk Festival to Schlachtschüssel (roast pig feast).

To read the complete Mainpost article in German, visit Thank you, team Schweinfurt

Here are some random photos from my last visit to Schweinfurt.

Ledward Barracks

Ledward Barracks

Autobahn

Autobahn

SKF building

SKF building

Area Mud

Area Mud

Luke & Duke, the Nukes Grafenrheinfeld

Luke & Duke, the Nukes
Grafenrheinfeld

Mainberg Castle in the 1960s

Thanks to Russell Satterthwait, a blog reader and former U.S. soldier stationed in Schweinfurt/Germany during the Cold War years, is here to share some of his memories and photos.

This is what Russell had to say:

The year of the photographs is 1965. I was wandering in the high hills between Mainberg and Schonungen with a couple of Army buddies. Like you, we were suddenly confronted by a herd of sheep, in the midst of which was a tall gaunt sheepherder attired in a slouched waterproof hat and matching shoulder to ankle oilskin slicker and shepherds crook. He murmered “Gruss Gott”, then disappeared as swiftly as he had materialized like an apparition from a nineteenth century novel.

Further along the path, I came to a stone wall with an open doorway. I stepped in and said to my buddies, “would you look at this?”. We felt we had stepped into a Grimm fairytale castle. These are the photos I took.

Castle Mainberg in 1965

The sheepherder Russell refers to comes from a recent post (December 2011) about the same topic, A Shepherd tending his Flock. It is quite amazing to drive through this area of Germany and see this relic from the past.