Flying Boat Museum in Foynes, Ireland

When my travel companion suggested visiting the ‘Flying Boat Museum’ in Foynes, I was quite surprised. I had never heard of ‘flying boats’ before, but it was well worth our visit.

For more about the history of the flying boats, visit the Flying Boat Museum website.

This photo was taken while sitting outside the museum’s café. Foynes is a small village of 600 residents (last reported in 2006).

Foynes

The first part of the museum has many interesting paraphernalia, such as showing how Irish Coffee was invented at the terminal building in Foynes, how two sisters both worked at the airport and became the envy of many Irish girls, how all the passengers and flight crew were housed, and much more.

Foynes - the Center of the World

Foynes – the Centre of the World

Stepping inside the Yankee Clipper is the second part of the museum visit.

Yankee Clipper at the Flying Boat Museum in Foynes, Ireland

Yankee Clipper at the Flying Boat Museum in Foynes, Ireland

It had dining facilities, sleeping cots, and was quite spacious compared to today’s air travel.

Seats on the Yankee Clipper

Seats on the Yankee Clipper

Flying boat Yankee Clipper cockpit

 

Flying Boat Museum, Foynes

After the museum visit, we walked around a bit. It must have been laundry day.

Laundry day in Foynes

Notes from Asdee, Ireland

Having spent four days in the quiet North Kerry village of Asdee, the most memorable parts of this trip were the abundant montbretia, which added color to an otherwise grey and rainy visit to that corner of Ireland in early August. The other one is that I spent four evenings there and did not visit a single pub, neither daytime nor evening time. You see, it can be done. Wonders never seize.

The village of Asdee, situated at the mouth of the Shannon estuary, is very quiet and has little infrastructure.

Asdee shore, Ireland

These montbretia decorate many private gardens and roadsides.

Montbretia

montbretia

While searching for charity shops, we passed this rather sad-looking Charlie Chaplin in the window.

shop window

The shore lines, once for strategic reasons are dotted with castle ruins. This left side of the castle shows the Men’s Beach. To the right of the castle, you find the Ladies Beach. Both are unisex these days.

IMG_1298

The Shannon Ferry has just left the port.

Shannon Ferry

In the town of Ballybunion, a coastal town and seaside resort in County Kerry, I saw this attraction. If you can call it one, that is. Former President Clinton preparing for a swing of golf. The plaque underneath reads:

President Bill Clinton

This sculpture was unveiled by Mr. Charlie McCreevy T.D. Minister for Finance

on the 5th of September 1998

to commemorate the golfing visit by the President of the United States of America

The plaque

Bill Clinton in Ballybunion

Some tidbits about Asdee:

* Jesse James’s father was born there. Jessie himself was an American outlaw, gang leader, bank robber, train robber, and murderer from the state of Missouri, USA.

*The last claim to fame for Asdee was the moving statues of Mary in 1985. 30 schoolchildren saw two Marian statues moving in the church at Asdee.

Notes from Co. Cork, Ireland

During our one-week stay on the Sheep’s Head peninsula, we encountered ten minutes of dark skies and rain. The rest of the time was sunny, windy, and dry, with regular overnight rain though.

These standing stones were mentioned in the tour guide book, so we took this little walk from our cottage  further up the hill.  With the clouds hanging so low, it made for an eerie feeling.

Standing stone

Old barns gracing the wayside.

barn roof

That’s how peat is sold at grocery stores.

peat

peat

A sign in Kilcrohane advertising Sunday’s carnival got us curious. For some reason, I did not expect a sports competition. One local had mumbled ‘Yeah, they try to outdo each other….’, but I had associated carnival with a parade. It was worth it – alone for the people watching. This little guy on the right (sitting on the pole) was a real fighter.

Irish carnival  Carnival in Kilcrohane

Somewhere along the shore, of which there is plenty. Based on the World Resources Institute, Ireland’s coastline measures 6.437 km.

Maria at the shore

Eating Out in Ireland

Ireland’s restaurants and pubs have their traditional dishes as well as fusion food. At Ma Murphys Pub in Bantry, I enjoyed my first taste of Shepherd’s Pie.

Just found this YouTube clip of Ma Murphy’s Pub. Surprise, surprise. I recognized Mary, the owner, as the lady who had served us. It also featured her best customer, Shaun, sitting in the corner of the pub. He had talked to us on our way in, and out. I just nodded in a friendly way. My Irish comprehension skills are limited unless I have a stout to go with it.

Shepherd's Pie

Shepherd’s Pie

On our last morning in Ireland, we stayed at a centrally located Bed & Breakfast in Cork. The lady owner from Creedon’s Bed & Breakfast (on tripadvisor) hugged us before we said goodbye. A nice young man named Finbar kissed me on the street. The Irish are a warmhearted folk. And their breakfast warms my palate too.

Irish breakfast

Irish breakfast

My husband, a Marylander, can’t get enough of seafood. Here we had lunch at The Waterfront (a.k.a. Chez Youen) in Baltimore, Co. Cork. It seemed this restaurant, along with two other adjoining ones, form the center of town, from where you have a great view. All in all though, I was a bit disappointed by this seaside village, because it is mostly residential. At least, we had a good lunch .

Seafood platter in Baltimore, Ireland

Seafood platter in Baltimore, Ireland

 

Here we are at the Elbow Lane in Cork, where my husband had this tasting tray for € 9,50.

Beer tasting tray at the Elbow Lane in Cork

Beer tasting tray at the Elbow Lane in Cork

The restaurant is often fully booked and many hungry folks had to be turned away or told to wait at least an hour. We are sturdy, so we decided to have a seat outside and brave the possible rain. We were rewarded, these were some of the best back ribs I’ve ever had. And the rain stayed away.

spare ribs

Decided to have a go at the kimchi salad, and it was delicious. Fusion food at its best.

kimchi salad

Ireland is the best place to turn an abandoned church into a place to feed the hungry. This Church Restaurant stands in Skibbereen.

Church Restaurant in Skibbereen, Ireland

Church Restaurant in Skibbereen, Ireland

When we travel, we like to explore the culinary side of the country. The selection of food, as well as language usage, offer a good mirror image of its people. That’s hearty and kind for the Irish.

Bantry House and Garden in West Cork, Ireland

The Bantry House and Garden is located in Co. Cork along the Wild Atlantic Way.

The second Earl of Bantry and Mary, his wife, traveled to the continent with notebooks and sketchbooks to bring home ideas for recreating their own palazzo by the water.

Standing there and overlooking the Bantry Bay (a deep-water gulf extending for 30 km to the west), it really had a Mediterranean feel to it. Add the sunshine, and the breeze from the water, and your mind might easily get transported to a more southern location.

Bantry House Park

This is the back door of the manor. Behind these big windows is a beautiful library.

Bantry House back

The dining room at the Bantry House.

Bantry House dining room

The photo was taken behind the gate to the staples. No matter where, the southern feeling was always there.

Bantry House gate

The Bantry Manor Garden is splendid and well cared for.

Bantry House hedges

We climbed the famous Hundred Steps (there are 103 steps) to the top of the seven terraces. The house itself sits on the third terrace.

Bantry House steps

The euro 11  adult entrance ticket was really worth it.

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