My Experimental Kitchen – Ramen Omelet

Traveling is a wonderful thing. Sometimes it only takes an arm chair traveler to discover more fusion cuisine on the net. When our son returned from Nottingham for spring break in Germany, he asked me to assist him in the kitchen with a new Korean recipe.

He had read about this ramen omelet and we gave it a try. My cooking skills had lost any inhibitions I might have had throughout my traveling years. And I remember exactly when it happened – looking through the bakery shop window at lines of French bread rolls, filled with Spaghetti Napoli – in Japan. And that was just the beginning.

Anyway, we prepared cup shin ramen the usual way, but without adding the prepackaged chili powder. Then we drained the water.

At the same time, we beat three small eggs, and added a bit of soy sauce and sugar (the Japanese way) and then most of the chili powder (the Korean way). All this got thoroughly mixed, which took a bit longer because of dissolving the clumps of chili powder. In the meantime, the noodles cooled off, which is recommendable.

ramen omelet

When the egg was ready, we just placed the cooked noodles in the middle and folded it over like an Italian calzone.

cup ramen served the Italian way

Last, but not least, I asked our son to leave me a bite. He didn’t. He said it was very good, you have to take his word for it.

Optional: layer it with thin lines of ketchup

Some college students also claim this to be the best hangover food ever.

Mt. Aso on Kyushu

Back in 2008, we tried to get to the top of Mt. Aso, an active volcano on the southern island of Kyushu (Japan).  Due to heavy sulfur fumes, the top of the mountain was not accessible to the public.

Just this month, we were fortunate to visit Mt. Aso on a sunny morning.

On our way up, we stopped at this roadside stand selling blocks of sulfur.

Blocks of sulfur for sale on Mt. Aso

Notice the shade of green in the bubbling hot water.

Mt. Aso in Japan

This is one of my favorite pictures showing volcanic rock formations and a man-made rail.

Volcanic formations around Mt. Aso

Last, but not least. I have again become a fan of Japan’s unusual fusion food, strange concoctions, and unlikely flavorings, such as this one…. black sesame ice cream.

Black Sesame Ice Cream at Mt. Aso

Out of the unusual ice cream flavors I had sampled during this trip (Black Sesame, Wasabi and Corn), I liked the wasabi flavored one the best (more about that on my post about the Taio Gold Mine near Hita).