The Town of Chettehou in Normandy

We left our vacation rental in Barfleur on a Saturday morning, which also happened to be market day. This merry-go-round was the first thing we saw when we left the house.

Market day in Barfleur

We spent most of the day in and around Chettehou until we could check into our next accommodation at 4pm.

The guy on the ladder is street art.

Street art in Chettehou

The sign ‘1041km -> Erlabrunn’ signals the distance to its German sister city of Erlabrunn, which happens to be in my hometown area of Franconia (northern Bavaria).

Chettehou – Erlabrunn

The best way to spend a lazy afternoon is at the beach collecting sea glass.

This was our rental home, a former cider farm house. This living room used to be the place where horses (real horse power) turned the stone wheel to mash the apples.

Cider farm house in Chettehou

As usual, I enjoy the mornings sitting outside the most. Our little back yard had a creek, a waterfall (old water mill) in the back, and the biggest hazelnut tree I had ever seen.

This vacation rental was a bit off the beaten path, and you needed a car to get around (the other one in Barfleur was in the center of town). It was worth it.

German Gun Battery at La Pointe de Néville in Normandy

From Spain to Norway, Hitler had created an “Atlantic Wall”, composed of defensive fortifications, such as this gun battery at La Pointe de Néville.

Most of the gun emplacements were destroyed.

Beach at La Pointe in Néville
Entrance to a bunker in Néville
Part of the gun battery at Néville
Gun battery ceiling at Néville

Our next stop was the Gatteville Le Phare, which, at 71m in height, is the tallest lighthouse in France. It takes 365 stairs to reach the top, which is better suited to the sturdy traveler.

The Little Town of Réville in Normandy

The weather forecast called for 17° -19° C on most days in July. But with the sun, it felt more like 30°C, which can easily go unnoticed due to the constant breeze.

This food below is the reason for going to the French coast. So my husband can feast on seafood every day. My selection of dishes in seafood restaurants is rather limited, but the wine sure helps.

Every day, we took some short trips by car to visit other surrounding villages. Here we are in the village of Réville (population: about 1000), where we enjoyed some espresso, with the owner’s dog joining our table. I tried out my French on him. He walked away.

We also visited the local church and cemetery. I was very surprised to see sea glass used for decoration on graves. I collect it for other reasons…

A Grave in Réville, Manche, Normandy
Church in Réville

This statue by the famous French painter, Guillaume Romain Fouace, has a prominent place in the church. Fouace was born into a farm family in Réville in 1837. His tomb features a recumbent white marble statue of his daughter Beatrix (1875–1888).

Beatrix Fouace statue in Réville

The Town Hall of Reville is still decked out from D-Day, and for future activities to come.

Seafood platter are about € 25 – 30 on average.

Every evening, when we left the restaurant after some wining & dining, the boats sure look a bit off. 🙂

Hotel Moderne in Barfleur

Barfleur, most famous for its port a long time ago, is famous for oysters and mussels today.

Barfleur, Normandy

One of my interests is collecting historical postcards. With this one, we walked around town trying to locate it. The last mention of the hotel restaurant was made in some restaurant review forum in 2015.

This poster on site shows the Annexe Hotel Moderne, which is the building on the left. The one on the right is the post office today.

This is the the same Annexe Hotel Moderne today. We had hoped for a delicious smell wafting from the kitchen (any restaurant will do around lunch time), but instead only heard party music blaring at noon. The restaurant itself, a different building on the left of the square, looked very closed up, and in a neglected condition, so it was not worth taking a photo. As a matter of fact, at first we passed right by it during our search.

Annexe Hotel Moderne, Barfleur

Normandy is dotted with deserted beaches like this. I hope it stays this way.

The Village of Tocqueville: Final Resting Place for Alexis de Tocqueville

The little village of Tocqueville (population: about 280) has erected a bust for the French diplomat, political scientist, and historian, Alexis de Tocqueville. Tocqueville himself was born in Paris, attended school in Metz, died in Cannes, and is buried in Tocqueville.

He is best known for his works ‘Democracy in America’ and ‘The Old Regime and the Revolution’.

Bust of Alexis de Tocqueville

This is the church and cemetery where he is buried.

Tocqueville Church

We combed the hole cemetery for his grave, and initially could not find it. With the help of a sight-map in the church, we finally located the grave next to one of the side entrances.

Alexis de Tocqueville grave

One of the many mosaic windows in the Tocqueville Church.

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