Virtual Tour of Mainberg Castle, Germany, on 12 September 2021

Every year on the second Sunday in September, the Open Monument Day is being held nationwide.

This year, Mainberg Castle will also participate, but only virtually.

To visit, you need to go on their website: https://www.fv-schloss-mainberg.de/

The website provides ZOOM Client, which lets you partake in 30-minute visual tours which run from 13:00 – 17:00 on 12 Sep 2021 (Central European Time).

Mainberg Castle near Schweinfurt

Some of you might have heard that Germany has been hit by severe flooding in the past few days.

A week ago, we spent the weekend in my hometown area to attend a family reunion, and we were blessed with a day of blue skies and sunshine amid a long stretch of dark and gloomy days.

Here we came down Mainberger Straße on our way to attend our get-together in Hausen/Schonungen. The Main River, on the right hand side of the tracks, has not been affected by the constant rain falls yet. Most of the flooding is happening in the far western part of Germany.

Mainberger Straße Schweinfurt

A hotel, overlooking the Mainberg Castle, is in the works right now. The Martin Family purchased a former farming estate on ‘Grundstrasse’ in Mainberg, and the hotel with Café and ‘Weinstube’ is supposed to be up and running by the summer of 2022.

This is an article in German about the project: https://www.mainpost.de/regional/schweinfurt/mainberg-die-martins-und-ihr-hotel-projekt-art-10486991

Photos of Mainberg Castle Taken During World War II

The following pictures were contributed by Susan Panioli and her sister Lorraine O’Dell, the daughters of Veteran Leroy F. O’Dell, who served with the 313th Infantry and the 79th Division during WWII in France, Germany, Belgium, and Czechoslovakia.

The river you see on the left to the church tower is the Main River.

Mainberg Castle and the village

This is one of Leroy F. O’Dell’s friends (name unknown). It seems they were having some fun by putting a helmet on the statue’s head.

I’m glad Susan P. decided to share her father’s photos with my readers, and the Historical Society of Mainberg Castle.

A Visit to Mainberg Castle in Northern Bavaria, Germany

One of my stateside readers, whose ancestors lived and worked at the Mainberg Castle from 1822 -1842, was able to visit there for the first time last summer.

Quoted: “… we made arrangements to visit the castle, when our river cruise ship was docked at Würzburg. We only had less than 90 minutes at the castle, but had a nice tour by the caretaker…”

He then gave me permission to share the link to his Google photo album (amazing photos!) taken at Mainberg Castle: https://tiny.cc/xzdm5y

In general, if you are also interested in learning more about castles and palaces in Germany, then this might be your guide (e-book in English).

Mainberg Castle in Germany in the 1940s

These photos were contributed by Susan Panioli and her sister Lorraine O’Dell, the daughters of Veteran Leroy F. O’Dell, who served with the 313th Infantry and the 79th Division during WWII in France, Germany, Belgium, and Czechoslovakia.

Leroy F. O’Dell

Susan believes the photos were taken of Mainberg Castle by her father sometime between September 1944 and May 1946. Leroy was also wounded during the war and received the Purple Heart. He’s now 93 years of age (born 16 May, 1925), and is living in a nursing home in upstate NY, USA.


I’m in the process of finding someone who can identify and verify the location of these photos.

Edited on 14 June 2018: I just got word from the expert himself – these photos were indeed taken at Mainberg Castle. (Source: Thomas Horling, Mainberg Castle Historian)

 

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